Birmingham Sunday in 4 Little Girls

I thought Spike Lee’s use of the folk song “Birmingham Sunday” by Joan Baez in the opening of the 4 Little Girls documentary was perfect as the song, juxtaposed with the images of four girls that the song was about, perfectly places the viewer into the time period and gives an immediate overview of what happened on that fateful day at 16th Street Baptist Church.

More so than that, I thought Lee’s ability to recall the song later in the film, when it is revealed that Bill Baxley listened to Baez’s Continue reading “Birmingham Sunday in 4 Little Girls”

Spike Lee in Get On The Bus

It is interesting to note that Get on The Bus is Lee’s first film in which he does not play a starring role. Despite this fact his presence was still felt through the character Xavier. I know that when I viewed the film I clearly saw similarities between himself and Xavier (AKA “X”), a UCLA film student who is making a documentary film on the Million Man March. Continue reading “Spike Lee in Get On The Bus”

25th Hour Montage: Continuation of Do The Right Thing

 

In the most famous scene from Lee’s 2002 film, 25th Hour, Edward Norton’s character goes on to to curse out every single race and creed in New York City in a montage that people have read as a love/hate letter to all New Yorkers.

Continue reading “25th Hour Montage: Continuation of Do The Right Thing”

Spike Lee: The Man Behind the Camera

I always love it when other members of this post blog information, quotes or interviews with Spike Lee. I feel like we spend a lot of time in class conjecturing about what Spike Lee was thinking or trying to say with each one of his films, so sometimes it is nice to get to check our conjectures with actual evidence of Lee’s thought process. With that in mind, I thought I would end the semester by sharing some cool facts about Lee.

Continue reading “Spike Lee: The Man Behind the Camera”

Poll: Favorite Spike Lee Joint?

Malcolm X: Controversy Around Assassination and Lee’s Portrayal

What was the true role of the FBI in Malcolm X’s assassination? And how did Lee portray his murder in the biographical film of Malcolm X?

When Lee’s film Malcolm X was first released there was some controversial reviews on his portrayal of Malcolm X’s assassination. People were upset that they believed Lee to portray the NOI as solely responsible for the assassination, believing that the few radical muslims that murdered X were not representative of the NOI. As well, this portrayal sends a message of black-on-black violence that is destructive imagery. Lee responds to these criticisms in the following article, addressing his understanding of the assassination and the role of the parties involved.

Spike Lee Defends ‘Malcolm X’ 

Continue reading “Malcolm X: Controversy Around Assassination and Lee’s Portrayal”