4 Little Girls: Effective moments and contrast

What I enjoyed so much about this documentary was the effectiveness of it. It was simple, powerful, factual, and used a perfect combination of contrast, interviews of family and friends of the girls juxtaposed with archival footage and various interviews with people like George Wallace and Arthur Hanes Jr. Below are some examples or screenshots of moments that were very effective or people who provided personal anecdotes about their daughter (like the McNairs) that gave the audience a visceral reaction. There were many moments that I did not include but these are just a few that really stood out to me: Continue reading “4 Little Girls: Effective moments and contrast”

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Malcolm X

I first watched this movie when I was in 7th grade. Not in school, not in a predominately white district in a small town in North Carolina. I saw it at home with my parents. I had known nothing about Malcolm X previous to viewing. My grandparents had a picture of him doing his famous thinking pose next to MLK Jr., who looked calmly ahead, on their wall. I didn’t even know that that was Malcolm X. But I was intrigued by the picture – he looked so intelligent. When I thought about Malcolm X, vague terms came to mind. “Radical”, “black panther”, and “violent” to name a few. That is what I got from school. MLK Jr. was lauded and Malcolm X was ignored, or spoken about in those terms. I watched Malcolm X for the first time, and also for the first time, felt rage over something not related to me. I considered it a gross injustice that he had been painted so poorly in my head; that I had been lied to, or at least mislead; and that he had been assassinated for daring to speak poorly of other people, when he was right. That is not the America I had known. And for the first time I was forced to think about free speech. I was forced to think, heavily, about being black. Following the viewing, I did research of my own. I learned about Fred Hampton, and COINTELPRO. This movie is the first time I critically thought about race issues. And for that reason, other than that it is an amazing movie in its own right, Malcolm X is my favorite Spike Lee movie. And I agree with him completely. Everyone should be forced to watch it.